In-House SEO: Factors to Consider Part 1

mobile apps concept 639 x 268 px  8.88 x 3.72 in  72 dpiThere are a number of considerations that should be taken into account when deciding to keep Search Engine Optimization (SEO) efforts in-house. For example, the importance of SEO needs to be advocated from the top down in order for the goals of the program to be accomplished. Additionally, high-quality SEO work requires the integration of multiple disciplines. In order for your organization to avoid potential pitfalls, consider these in-house SEO dynamics:

Time

Documenting the process of optimization is a good first step in order to determine whether or not your organization has the necessary time and resources for SEO. A well-maintained SEO program typically requires a minimum time commitment of 40 to 50 hours per month. The speed with which your company wants new optimized pages in market is another consideration. In-house SEO typically faces fewer roadblocks when implementing changes, but the SEO team may or may not have the time or expertise to address every issue. Results will heavily depend on time management and internal organization.

Control

In-house SEO typically has greater control over content requirements because they have easier access to other departments involved in implementing changes. This can be a significant advantage of keeping SEO in-house, but it can become a disadvantage in some circumstances. Depending on the size and scope of resources available, inter-departmental communication issues may prove to be a challenge if they hinder an in-house SEO team from delivering results. Lines dictating responsibilities can also become blurred internally, so it may prove difficult to hold an in-house team to the same level of accountability to which a third-party agency can be held.

Evolution

The search marketing industry is an ever-evolving one. In addition to the ongoing management of an SEO program, you should consider whether or not an in-house team has the bandwidth to stay current with industry trends and changes. Your company should take steps to ensure that time is being dedicated to staying current (or even ahead of) the trends and developing in-house resources. Employees may need supplemental training on software or procedures to maximize productivity and effectiveness. So in weighing the financial considerations of in-house vs. outside agency SEO, remember that the salaries of your in-house team are not the only factor to consider.

Whether working through an agency or not, those responsible for SEO work should be well-versed in a brand and its technical and legal nuances. One question to keep in mind is whether your SEO team needs to be equipped with an exceptionally rich understanding of your company’s industry and/or products at hand. Companies that make significant ongoing updates to their websites and franchise operations, and companies that provide highly technical products or services may prefer to keep SEO in-house rather than hiring an agency. The benefits of having a staff member dedicated to finding and resolving issues may outweigh any associated costs if the job requires a deep understanding of industry or brand-specific nuances.

Although in-house SEO teams tend to have greater control over resources, they may not have full control. Unexpected challenges may or may not outweigh the cost-saving benefit of not hiring an agency.  If your organization decides to keep SEO in-house, it is imperative to make sure the individual or SEO team is well-equipped with the resources needed to deliver results and drive overarching business goals.

What benefits does your organization find with keeping SEO in-house?

How to Practice Integrated SEO

search marketing integrated approach to search engine optimization

What is Integrated SEO?

You have your content marketing team, your PPC team, business operations, and sales team. Are these departments working together toward common goals? SEO is one way to build your brand’s visibility on the web, and bringing everyone into the loop can help you accomplish that in ways you might not expect.

An integrated SEO program is one that is intertwined with broad organizational goals as well as synchronized with the individual activities of other departments. It requires understanding that on-site elements—such as content and the website’s technical focus—need reinforcement through off-site components, such as social signals, link signals, and user signals. Here are some steps you can take to implement an integrated SEO program across all departments.

Define Your Goals

What are the business goals of the organization? What are the goals of the marketing department? How do marketing goals relate to the larger business goals? Before beginning any program, you must know the goals and how you will measure them. For an integrated SEO program, understanding the overall goals of the organization will help you make informed decisions. This understanding is crucial in helping you determine the specific operational goals of the SEO program. By defining goals from the outset, you can make sure your SEO program is enhancing an overarching marketing strategy rather than becoming a separate (and potentially misunderstood) component of it. Since this is an integrated approach, all initiatives must be working together.

Another point to consider during this preliminary process is how the success of the SEO program will be measured. Defining success metrics can help you choose the best tools to operate and track your program and manage expectations for the program as it evolves. Building shared metrics or KPIs is a great way to ensure collaboration and integration from the beginning.

Enable Success

It is important to keep your team informed about SEO objectives and how those efforts connect to the overall marketing goals. In addition, it may be beneficial to equip other departments with resources to help them incorporate SEO best practices into their routines. For example, a list of the top 20 keywords can help the marketing department, PR, and other teams better focus their efforts and message when working on their initiatives. Building shared resources and project plans make it easier to work together for success and maximize results. Open lines of communication and education about SEO can help keep everyone on that same path toward success.

Measure Results

A well-executed SEO program will require the use of various on-and off-website tools. Defining goals and metrics early on can streamline the tool selection process.

Competitive situations, business goals, and marketing goals all play a part in the selection of keywords, so it may be wise to invest in a keyword research tool. Other tools will analyze content and suggest changes in structure or verbiage. Integrating SEO with an overarching marketing program also requires providing an education on best practices and reinforcing them through the reporting process. In addition to research tools, you may want to acquire reporting tools that will help you effectively analyze and present the results of your optimization efforts.

With the right tools, you can track the success of your program and compare your program to your competitors over time. It is a best practice to examine comparative data month over month, as well as year over year, to properly account for the impact of seasonality.

Bring Everyone to the Table

SEO is a changing and evolving tactic that is often misunderstood. Instead of practicing SEO as a stand-alone service, integrate SEO wherever possible. It is a best practice to include all company departments involved in marketing initiatives, especially those responsible for content creation and website design. Keeping everyone in the loop helps connect the dots between individual departments. It also helps the organization capture every opportunity for optimization, such as time-sensitive or impromptu campaigns, partnerships, and promotions. In some companies, keyword research also impacts product research teams, as users’ needs may be expressed through queries and also through the words they use to describe products.

Key Takeaways

The results of an SEO program will vary depending on the specifics of your organization. Understanding goals, agreeing on metrics, and involving everyone in the process makes it easier to discuss objectives and how to achieve them as the program evolves. By understanding where SEO fits, setting realistic expectations, and fully integrating the idea of SEO into your organization, you will establish the foundation required to produce measurable results.

Does your organization practice an integrated approach to SEO? Share your tips in the comments!

Investing in SEO: Factors to Consider

SEO, SEM, digital marketingWhen it comes to implementing an SEO program, there are many factors a company needs to consider. What are your goals? What resources are available internally? What areas should you invest in to be successful? The best option for your company will depend on a complete assessment of what you want to accomplish with an SEO program, the internal time and budget resources available, the level of expertise required, and how SEO will fit into your integrated marketing mix.

Establish Goals

Before diving into the logistics, it is important to understand what it takes to perform SEO correctly and effectively. An assessment of expectations should be completed before determining how and where resources will be allocated. Is traffic or sales more important? Is there a geographic set of goals? What are the business outcomes and the interim milestone goals? What does a solid SEO program look like? Do you have the time and expertise necessary to carry out such a program? Once you have established goals, you can better determine whether or not you have the manpower, time, and level of expertise required to deliver success.

Experience and Expertise

Once goals are established, your company will have to determine a budget. Setting a budget helps to properly strategize how your program will operate. One of the primary questions to consider for a budget is whether or not staff is available to manage an SEO program, or if hiring a dedicated in-house SEO expert is a realistic option. It is important to keep in mind that a well-maintained SEO program requires a significant time commitment— 50 – 100 hours per month could be expected. If neither option is feasible, finding an SEO agency may be a worthwhile alternative. Even with an agency, though, you’ll need to designate an employee who will own the program and help ensure success.

There are many educational resources available to help users learn about SEO, as well as tools that can maintain various components of an SEO program. Choosing to remain in-house may help absorb some costs, but it may become necessary to invest money in tools necessary to implement and maintain an SEO program. Total costs for a complete suite of on- and off-website resources should also be factored into your budget. Remember that a correctly executed SEO program can take an average of 4 – 6 months to deliver real results. Your company should decide whether it has the time and money to experiment with various tools.

Another factor to consider is the level of knowledge at hand in comparison to the knowledge required to carry out SEO. An effective SEO program is multifaceted; it is imperative to understand how various components—such as content writing, link signals, page-load factors, platforms, and more—work together to drive results. While someone in-house may have enough time to dedicate to SEO efforts, you should consider whether or not they have the level of foundational knowledge needed as well as the extra time required to stay up to date with important changes in a fast-paced industry.  Agencies that specialize in SEO are committed to keeping up with the latest industry news, trends, resources, and best practices. In addition, agencies usually have experience managing SEO for a wide range of clients. By investing in an agency, your company essentially purchases a level of reliability, experience, and accountability that is not always attainable internally.

Overall Marketing Integration

After considering internal resources and capabilities, you should determine how SEO will fit with other marketing efforts. Companies that already work with agencies for other marketing tactics may choose to take the same route with SEO. Many agencies also provide a full range of services to help integrate SEO with overall marketing efforts to boost its effectiveness. If your company decides that working with an agency is the most cost-effective option, it is critical to define what the agency’s unique role will be within or in conjunction with your existing marketing structure.

A decision on how to invest in an SEO program will ultimately depend on your company’s goals and resources. With all these considerations taken into account, your company should be able to easily determine how and where to allocate resources in order to implement an SEO program and find success with it.

Have you decided to keep SEO in-house? Stay tuned. In a later post, we’ll discuss how to implement and manage an in-house SEO program.

How does your company manage SEO efforts? Do you work with an agency? Let us know in the comments.

 

 

Has Blogging Outlived its Usefulness in SEO?

In an ever-changing industry like digital marketing, it’s important to stay current and implement practices that will give your business an advantage over the competition. With close to a billion blogs on the Internet, it’s easy to get lost in the crowd. With so much competition, has blogging outlived its usefulness in SEO? The answer depends on a few factors.

The Importance of Content

Whether or not blogging for SEO is useful anymore is a complicated question. No matter what your goal, a blog post needs to be compelling to both readers and search engines in order to be effective.

Long gone are the days of writing blog posts stuffed with keywords for “SEO.” Now, blogs should focus on great, sharable content. An initial focus on blog content rather than intent can ultimately increase SEO value through the result of engaging content. Blog posts that are useful to readers are more likely to have a positive impact on overall traffic than those written with the intent to lure visitors to your website. Engaging blog posts shared on social media drive traffic back to your website, improving social signals picked up by search engines.

Search engines have become sensitive to the content itself, so a blog lacking rich content can be counterproductive. Search engines’ complex algorithms pick on up on the content as a whole. A blog with well-developed content can help leverage your business or brand as an informed thought leader in the industry, fostering an engaged online community. This thought leadership sparks engagement in the social space, resulting in improved SEO value.

Additionally, consistent blog posting helps keep websites fresh and up-to-date, something search engines like to see. Many business owners struggle with keeping their website pages updated. Sharing blog posts on your website provides a solution to keep the website fresh.

How SEO Can Help

But is great content enough? SEO best practices should always be utilized to leverage your content. Conducting comprehensive keyword research can help you write an effective headline, develop proper meta tags, and contribute to on-page SEO. An SEO-friendly blog post should also include internal links to relevant content, descriptive image tags, and more. While these steps are no longer the only thing needed to maximize a blog’s reach in modern times, they are still an important foundation.

Proper search engine optimization on your blog posts can help drive high quality traffic to your site. Good SEO practices attract links, general social signals, and allow search engines to pick up on more keywords.

Harmony is Key

So has blogging outlived its usefulness in SEO? Not at all! Blogging and SEO are integral and interactive parts of a successful digital strategy. Today, it’s less about blogging for SEO and more about learning how to blog with SEO.

Engaging content combined with good SEO practices is still a great way to enhance your digital presence. Be sure to anchor your blog on high-quality content, but increase the reach of that content by incorporating SEO tactics on select blog posts. Once that foundation is in place, social signals can maximize SEO value. Blogs are still a critical component in a comprehensive digital strategy, but it is important to make sure great content, smart SEO strategies, and social media all work in harmony with one another in order to make the effort worthwhile.

Does your website have a blog? Why or why not?

 

How to Optimize for Local Search

Most experts agree that local search should continue to be an area of focus for search marketing professionals in 2014. Google continues to pay attention to improving local search results, and expanded use of the Local Carousel is just one example of Google’s recent enhancements. How should your business — assuming it has a physical location and regardless of size — optimize for local?

Here are some tips:

–  Claim Your Google Places Listing: Google Places are business listings that allow your business to be found on Google Search, Maps, Google+, and mobile devices. By claiming your Google Places listing, you’ll be able to ensure your address, telephone number, hours of operation, and contact information are correct, and you’ll be able to connect with customers by sharing photos, updates, news, and special offers. In addition, claiming your business allows you to respond to reviews that are placed within the site. Visit Google Places for Business to claim your listing.

Build a Dedicated Local Page: When building a page for local, remember that people searching locally are likely to have a more immediate need for your services. Thus, it’s important to add elements that will easily enable visitors to find your physical location. Store locators, mapping technology, telephone numbers, and product/service reviews are essential to your dedicated local page.

–  Identify Local Search Terms: Your market is generally coming from a geographic area that can be as narrow as a few-block radius or as wide as several counties. The geographic qualifiers depend on the size of your  community and the competition for your service. Think about how far your geographic reach is and add those search phrases to your dedicated local page. For example, people likely travel a short distance for a grocery store but may travel a significantly larger distance for fine arts and  accessories. Then, infuse the page with geographically relevant search terms including surrounding towns that searchers may include in their search to learn more about your business.

Get Listed in Local Directories: Once you have a dedicated local page, getting listed in many relevant local directories is an important local search factor. It is vital to make sure your citation information (name, address, phone number, description) matches the information in your Google Places listing. Google will discredit your business if there are inconsistencies between the Google Places listing and those listed in other directories such as Yelp, Foursquare, YP, and Patch.

You can quickly and easily manage your online business listings with a single click at Moz Local. Moz Local pushes your listings to all of the major local data aggregators, where search engines can access your information, ensuring it is correct, consistent, and visible across the web.

Be careful when using paid submission services. Some services will remove your listing(s) once you stop paying for the service. It’s worth noting that another advantage to manually submitting your business listing is that you’ll maintain control over your listing’s passwords.

Optimize Your Website for Mobile: With mobile penetration expected to reach upwards of 75% this year, more consumers are likely to be searching for your business from their mobile device. “If you want to stay relevant and attractive to your visitors, you need to provide them with easier access through their mobile devices,” says Ben Oren, Director of SEO at WhiteWeb Technologies.

Businesses should consider site design from a mobile-first perspective. Content, navigation, and interactions must be carefully developed for mobile. For example, content order is important because of its tendency to restack on smaller screens, and logical navigation is important because people are tapping buttons or links with their thumbs.

One option for mobile that many businesses are considering is responsive website design. With responsive design, your site adapts to the screen size of the device on which it’s displayed, which means that you won’t need a separate mobile version for your website. According to Google, responsive website design is considered an industry best practice and is their recommended configuration.

From an SEO perspective, site owners can develop a mobile SEO strategy that includes location-based terms more likely to be used from a mobile device. Likewise, you won’t have to duplicate your link building, site authority, and social share efforts, as you’ll be able to dedicate your efforts to linking to a single site.

Engage With Your Customers: Google Places, Google+, Yelp,  Foursquare, and others are relevant because of the independent review provided by consumers. Engage your customers via social media or other methods, and encourage them to leave reviews on local directory sites. Positive reviews add credibility to your brand, increase your domain  authority, and provide Google with clues that your business should appear high on search results.

Optimizing for local search is no longer an optional activity. It’s an essential part of your overall optimization strategy and should not be overlooked.

 

Factors That Impact Your Positioning in a YouTube Search

In our last blog post, we discussed optimization strategies for your video content. By providing visitors with compelling titles, descriptions, and tags, you are providing YouTube’s search engines with the triggers to support your optimization efforts. Like the content triggers discussed earlier, there are several engagement factors that are influential in getting your videos to the top of YouTube.

Much attention has been paid to Google’s ranking factors and algorithm and how they impact your positioning on Google.  By becoming aware of YouTube’s ranking factors, you could improve your video’s rankings on both YouTube and Google. Here are some critical engagement factors that influence your video’s YouTube ranking:

1. Trust and authority of your YouTube channel

YouTube prefers video producers that routinely produce quality video content. Thus, it looks not only at engagement of individual videos but also at engagement of your video channel overall. Factors such as number of subscribers, number of channel views, and the overall age of your video channel are important in ensuring consistently high ranking videos.

2. Engagement of your videos

While the overall number of views is surely an important factor in a high-ranking video, it is more important for your video to be interesting to those who choose to view it. How long do your videos keep your viewer’s attention? Generally speaking, videos that capture 40% of the viewer’s attention (i.e., over two minutes of a five minute video) will help your video rank higher. YouTube looks at two audience factors – absolute (what percentage of your video is watched) and relative (how does this compare to other videos of similar length?).

3. Social signals

As with traditional SEO, social media links appear to be an increasingly important factor in the overall strength of your content. Factors that indicate video social sharing include embeds, external links, and the strength of the sites the video is being shared on. Particularly strong social sharing sites include Digg, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+ so be sure to prompt sharing to these and other sites when posting your video.

4. Comments, responses, and reactions

YouTube wants to gauge how much dialogue your video generates. The numbers of comments, likes, and responses are important factors in determining your video’s ranking. Note: video responses in particular are hugely important. After all, YouTube is a video sharing site. If your video is responsible for creating additional video content for YouTube, you’ve hit an SEO home run.

Likes and shares are also factors that determine level of interest in your video. YouTube gives significant weight to the number of shares.

YouTube has determined that engagement is a better measurement of quality and satisfaction than simple views. As Google has given greater importance to Quality Score, YouTube has given greater importance to engagement. In both, the common threads are quality and relevance. If you create quality and relevant content for your readers and viewers, you stand a much better chance of getting to the top of every search engine.

 

 

 

How Optimizing Video Can Lead to Traffic and Conversions

What’s the second largest search engine behind Google?

Bing? No.

Yahoo? No.

AOL? No.

The correct answer, of course, is YouTube, which processes more than 3 billion searches each month. Additionally, since November 2011, YouTube video results are embedded into Google search results. Try typing “psy Gangnam style” into Google, and the first four results, ahead of Wikipedia, Facebook, and Billboard, are YouTube videos. (Psy’s Gangnam Style, incidentally, is the most watched video of all time with nearly 2 billion views as of February 10, 2014. Thus, it seems logical for search marketers to think beyond Google and Bing. Search strategies must include all aspects of digital marketing, including video. Let’s examine the key strategies for optimizing your video content.

1.  Choose the most relevant content for your business – Context is equally important in video optimization as it is in search optimization.  A simple tutorial on how to use your product is a great video for product marketers. Hosting a webinar that conveys your expertise on a particular subject is a great choice for service marketers. Remember, consumers like video because it gives them a better understanding of your product or service. It aids in the decision-making process. As you develop your script, put yourself in the mind of the searcher. Include phrases that are searched on often.

2.  Select a keyword relevant title for your video – The title of your video is like a PPC ad. Its purpose is to gain a click-through. Choose a title that is relevant to the content of your video, but exciting and engaging enough to get that coveted click-through. Your title should include a key phrase that your research determined to be the most relevant search phrase for your desired action.

3.  Include tags – Tags are keywords and phrases that provide the YouTube search engine with clues as to what your video is about. Think of them as hashtags for your videos. List your most relevant tags first, as order does play a factor in YouTube’s algorithm. Be as specific as possible so you can limit the amount of competition for your video. What makes your video unique? Try to include the same keywords you included in your video’s title.

4.  Write a keyword-rich description – Make sure you use the same relevant keyword phrases that you included in your title and tags. This consistency will go a long way towards establishing the relevancy that is so important to both Google and YouTube. Be thorough and comprehensive. So many video creators cut corners when developing their video’s description, but you can really give yourself an edge if you provide YouTube visitors with an in-depth description.

5.  Upload a transcript – Uploading a transcript to YouTube is an easy way to ensure your targeted keywords are interpreted correctly by the search engines. Simply create a .txt file of your video’s script, and upload it to YouTube via the Video Manager section of your YouTube account. When you name the .txt file, use the search term you’re optimizing for in your .txt file’s name. Additionally, by uploading a transcript, you automatically enable YouTube’s captions.

6.  Create a video sitemapGoogle Webmaster Tools provides simple instructions on how to create a video sitemap.

Each entry must contain the following pieces of data:

1. Title
2. Description
3. Play page URL
4. Thumbnail URL
5. Video file location or player URL

It is recommended that you host your video on YouTube and embed the YouTube video on your own site.

Optimizing video is a process, and like traditional SEO, will reap tremendous benefits to your business or your client’s business when followed correctly.

 

 

Google Not Provided: Privacy Issue or Just a Ploy to Get More AdWords Sales?

GoogleNotProvided Just last week, numerous SEO blogs and news outlets reported that Google is soon going to start encrypting all search activity both for users who
are signed in as well as those who are not. The only exception will be clicks on ads, which Google will not encrypt. As you can image, this has many marketers up in arms and others simply scratching their heads wondering what comes next. Are there going to be any benefits for marketers, or is this the end of keyword data as we know it?

The Quick Basics: What Does Google “Not Provided” Mean? Hubspot reminded us that the discussion of encryption actually started back in October 2011 when Google announced that any users who are logged in to a Google product (Google+, Gmail, YouTube, etc.) would have encrypted search results. Essentially, a marketer would not be allowed to see the keywords someone used before visiting his/her company’s website, so knowing which keywords to optimize for was a struggle. As any good marketer knows, keyword insights open the door not only for optimizing an actual webpage but also for improving content marketing, retargeting, identifying audience, and much more.

The Real Reason Why: Is Google Doing this to Enhance Their AdWords Sales? Google is claiming it is for extra protection for searchers—a completely valid reason that makes sense. However, many in the field are a bit skeptical. Marketing Land feels that Google might be attempting to block NSA spying activity, while Search Engine Watch threw out the idea that Google might soon release a new “premium” version of Google Analytics where users would pay a monthly fee in order to get access to full keyword data. A more popular opinion is that it could be to drive more people to use Google AdWords. Since ad clicks are not part of this new announcement, how can we not jump to that conclusion? Many are telling small businesses to use AdWords in order to gather this organic data. Consider some quotes from around the web:

QuickSprout: “Even if Google goes with ‘not provided’ for all your data, you can still uncover new keyword opportunities by using keyword research tools or spending money on AdWords.”

Search Engine Watch: “At this time advertisers still get full keyword referral data from Google, while there is speculation this could change sometime in the future, there is also the necessity for advertisers to be able to determine conversions from the traffic they are paying for.”

Search Engine Roundtable: Coming from a Webmaster World thread, “Go fully broad match on every single keyword and pay AdWords for your data.”

Moz: “Optionally, we can use AdWords to bid on branded terms and phrases. When we do that, you might want to have a relatively broad match on your branded terms and phrases so that you can see keyword volume that is branded from impression data.”

You certainly can’t blame anyone for giving users this advice because it is good advice. In fact, we’d give that advice ourselves. In short, Google’s plan has worked perfectly. It’s clear that AdWords is going to benefit and privacy was just a secondary thought in Google’s mind that happened to work perfectly when informing the public. Nevertheless, for now all we can really do is believe Google and move on to the next part of any announcement—create a new strategy that works.

Your Reaction: What to Do With Google Not Provided The first thing to understand is that the new change isn’t going anywhere so it’s time to react, whether you agree with Google’s decision or not. Fortunately, there are ways to cope without falling into their trap and spending a lot more money on AdWords; there are still things that you can measure using search data that isn’t necessarily keyword data. Consider some of your options below:

- Other search engines. The keyword trends you will find with search engines such as Bing and Yahoo are very similar to those you would find on Google. These engines have not encrypted their keyword data, so put your focus here and on the keywords that work.

- Traffic from organic. You might not be able to see the exact keywords people are using to find your website but that doesn’t mean you can’t see your overall organic traffic just like you’ve done in the past. It might take a bit more work, but figure out what you’re doing in the way of keywords and how your traffic is performing and then find correlations.

- Use filters and track landing pages. You might not be able to see the exact keyword someone used, but if you can set up a filter on all of the ‘not provided’ traffic and see which landing page those people landed on, you can get an idea of what it was they were searching for when they came to your website.

- Google Webmaster Tools. You can view your top pages and top search queries in GWT where you get clicks. Although you can’t see anything past 90 days, it’s still something that can help you keep track of your progress.

- Google Trends. This will help you see quickly if you are improving or you need to ramp up your efforts.

In the end, this Google update is just something else that will force marketers to adapt, but it isn’t going to take away your job or ruin your chances in the results pages (after all, everyone is in the same boat). Many see this as a positive move for the industry because it will force websites to create great content and put a focus on things that will really produce a great website. As a user, you’re going to be a little bit safer. Do you think this change was for privacy reasons, or do you think Google was more interested in lining their pockets with some increased AdWords sales? What are you going to do in response? Let us know your story and your thoughts in the comments below.

 

Photo Credit: lumicall.org

Amanda DiSilvestro gives small business and entrepreneurs SEO advice ranging from keyword density to recovering from Panda and Penguin updates. She writes for the nationally recognized SEO agency HigherVisibility.com that offers online marketing services to a wide range of companies across the country.


Opinions expressed in the article are those of the guest author and not necessarily SEMPO.

3 Ways to Measure Your SEO Success

Like any other marketing tactic, site owners want to see the results of their SEO investment. Are their efforts/time/money paying off? Since SEO is long-term, it’s often hard to show immediate progress, but with a few months of link building, content creation, and social activity under your belt, it’s usually possible to see some semblance of positive progress. Here are three ways site owners can measure their SEO success:

1. Increase in non-branded, organic traffic.

Probably the easiest way to measure SEO success, a growth in non-branded, organic traffic is usually a sure sign your SEO campaign is having a positive impact on your website. Visitors who come to your site through non-branded keywords didn’t necessarily set out looking to do business with your brand; they found you through the search engines. As you optimize your website and begin to build new links and fresh content and grow your social presence, your website earns more SEO value, helping it do better in the SERPs for various search phrases. Depending on your niche, your SEO growth might be a steady upward slope month after month, while for other companies it has its ups and downs and is a slower process. But even a small increase in organic traffic month over month adds up. While 50 new visitors a month may not seem like much right now, at the end of the year that’s an extra 600 visitors.

2. Increase in referral links and visitors.

As you build more content, both on your blog and on other industry sites, you are also building/earning natural links. One blog post on a popular niche blog can send hundreds of visitors to your site over a few months. For instance, I did an interview with link building expert Eric Ward, which he linked to from the homepage of his site. In a month that one referral link sent 800 unique visitors back to the blog post! As you build/earn links you might start to notice new referral links and extra bursts in traffic. For instance, one of my clients wrote a blog post that got linked to from a Forbes blogger (perfect example of earning links through content marketing!) and that post is still sending 25-50 visitors a month to their blog. Take a look in your Google Webmaster Tools account and download the latest links to see if there are any new referral links that indicate your SEO program is proving successful. You can also look in Google Analytics as well as Moz’s Open Site Explorer for new referral links.

3. Increase in number of non-branded keywords driving traffic.

While you may have a short list of “money keywords” that you want to do well for, those aren’t the only search phrases that could be driving traffic to your website. A good SEO program is about building organic traffic from as many relevant search phrases as possible because no two people are guaranteed to search for the same thing in the same way. You want your website to be a viable result for a wide variety of non-branded search phrases in order to connect with as large a customer base as possible. Take a look at your Google Analytics account, pick a time frame 6 months before your started your SEO campaign, and compare it to now—how many new non-branded keywords are appearing? It doesn’t matter if those new keywords sent 10 visitors apiece or just 1—more non-branded keywords is a good sign that your SEO campaign is helping improve your organic search presence.

Obviously the end goal of any marketing program is to increase sales, but it’s equally important to look at these SEO successes as steps along the conversion path. You can’t reach more customers if they can’t find your website, right? An increase in traffic, referral links, and non-branded keywords are all signs that your overall online presence is growing and with that comes more leads into your sales funnel.

About the Author

Nick Stamoulis is the President of Brick Marketing (http://www.brickmarketing.com/), a Boston-area SEO company. With over 13 years of industry experience, Nick Stamoulis shares his SEO knowledge by writing in the Brick Marketing Blog and publishing the Brick Marketing SEO newsletter, read by over 120,000 opt-in subscribers.

Contact Nick Stamoulis at 781-999-1222 or nick@brickmarketing.com

Do Your Keywords Account for Every Stage of the Customer Buying Cycle?

At the end of the day, the main goal of most SEO campaigns is to drive more targeted, organic, non-branded traffic from the SERPs to your website. The keywords you target on your site and with your content marketing efforts have a significant impact on the kinds of searches your website will rank for. Not everyone is going to search for the same thing in the same way, and depending on where searchers are in their buying cycle, they might be looking for different kinds of information. That’s why your keywords have to cover every stage of the customer buying cycle and include both informational and commercial keywords.

Informational Keywords

Informational keywords tend to have the highest amount of search volume because they are being used by searchers at the very beginning of their buying cycle and can lead searchers down many paths. Since these keywords have more search volume, they are “worth” a lot more to the companies targeting them with their SEO, since even 10% of 20,000 searches from one keyword would be a nice bump in organic traffic. This increase in competition makes it that much harder to rank well in the SERPs for these informational keywords, simply because so many other sites are fighting for top billing.

Let’s say I am an inventor and I need to hire a patent attorney. I have no idea how much I should pay for their services, how to tell if a patent attorney is trustworthy, and so forth. So my searches for “patent attorney” are going to involve more informational and broad keywords at the beginning as I’m looking to gather as much information as I can before making a final decision.  As I learn more, I might search for things like “patenting my idea,” “how to patent my invention,” “invention patent,” and more.

Broader keywords don’t usually convert as well as long-tail keywords because, as I mentioned before, they can take so many directions based on user intent. For instance, when I did a quick search for “patent attorney” the 4th site I saw in the SERPs (after all the local listings) was about how someone can become a patent attorney. As an inventor, that doesn’t help me very much. However, an actual patent attorney isn’t going to avoid targeting “patent attorney” as a keyword simply because some of the searchers might be looking for a new career path. This informational keyword could drive a lot of potential business to their site early on in the buying cycle, giving them more time to educate, inform, and build a rapport with those visitors. As the inventor, I might not pick up the phone and call the first result I click on, but maybe I scope out their services, read some of the blog, download a white paper about filing patents, and file that particular attorney away in the back of my mind. As I continue my searching and move further along my buying cycle, if I see that site again I might be more inclined to click back over.

Informational keywords are an important part of your SEO program because they can help introduce your website to a wider audience and help turn your company into a resource for those customers as they move through their buying cycle.

Commercial Keywords

Commercial keywords tend to be used by searchers who are further along in their buying cycle and are getting ready to pull the trigger. Obviously words like “buy,” “download,” “order,” and so forth are strong indicators that someone is looking to convert soon, but not every commercial keyword has to include a purchasing word like those. For example, let’s say I was interested in starting a vegetable garden in my backyard. My informational searches might be things like “planting a vegetable garden, “easy vegetables to grow,” “first time gardening tips,” and so forth. I’m not necessarily looking to buy anything just yet; I’m just trying to get a better understanding of what I’m getting myself into. However, as I move through my buying cycle and am getting ready to actually start planting, my searches might evolve to included things like “vegetable garden starter kit,” “vegetable garden soil mix,” or “raised vegetable garden bed.”  I don’t specifically say I want to buy something in my search phrase, but what I am searching for indicates I’m looking for a specific thing as opposed to general information.

Commercial keywords are an important part of your SEO campaign because these are the keywords that tend to make the money. While the conversion rate might be higher, more long-tail and specific keywords also tend to have a smaller search volume, meaning a smaller pie for you to drive traffic from. For instance, “vegetable gardening” might drive 3,000 visitors to a particular site while “organic vegetable garden pesticides” may only send 50 in the same time frame. However, someone using the more commercial keyword knows what they are looking for specifically and might be more inclined to buy sooner rather than later.

When it comes to SEO, you have to make certain that your keywords cover all stages of the buying cycle—all the way from the initial information gathering phase right up until the point where they pull out their credit card. Depending on what you are selling and how much it costs, the buying cycle might take several months to complete. Imagine if you had to lay down $10,000 for a product—you would probably take your time, right? Or your customer’s buying cycle could be relatively short if it’s a relatively straightforward purchase. But a good SEO campaign seeks to target both informational and commercial keywords because it helps your website appear in the SERPs for the broadest possible audience.

About the Author

Nick Stamoulis is the President of Boston SEO solutions company Brick Marketing (http://www.brickmarketing.com/). With over 13 years of industry experience, Nick Stamoulis shares his SEO knowledge by writing in the Brick Marketing Blog and publishing the Brick Marketing SEO newsletter, read by over 120,000 opt-in subscribers.

Contact Nick Stamoulis at 781-999-1222 or nick@brickmarketing.com